REVIEW: 'Replica' #3 by Paul Jenkins and Andy Clarke


★★★★☆ (4/5)

Paul Jenkins continues to build a chaotic world full of moving parts in 'Replica' but his greatest creation, Trevor Churchill, one of the best new characters in comics, helps keep it together amid the madness. Trevor's funny and cynical demeanor is at the center of quarterbacking all of his "replicas" or clones trying to solve a mystery. Now, if only he could get his hesher clone #3 to do his job it would make his life a lot easier. 

Trevor's wishes to get some much-needed competent help within the police force came true when he volunteered to clone himself. The fact the procedure went haywire and created 50 instead of just one clone became too much of a good thing especially when each one has a personality and expertise all their own. It helps to get things done but managing it all is exhausting. Jenkins has been capable of juggling all these threads about Trevor's investigation into the Machine Interfaction Section of the Transfer by keeping Trevor as our constant. He does it all with humor and great pacing. A high as a kite Vorgas is absolute gold no matter how familiar weed humor may be. 

Andy Clarke has his work cut out for him designing so many clones, variations of Trevor based on one aspect of his personality but each one is distinctive enough to tell them apart. It's remarkable to the attention to detail and scope of each panel with so many characters required to be busy in the background while Trevor barks orders at his replicas. Dan Brown's palette is limitless, providing a myriad of colors to the many scenes and characters offering fresh looks with each one. 

The world-building on 'Replica' #3 is eye-popping and the narrative growth from issue one to now is taking shape nicely as the mystery begins to unfold. Jenkins' Trevor Churchill is a great comic book character but his clones also get some development. AfterShock Comics has another winner on its hands and the fact that after three issues 'Replica' is still compelling and funny proves it.  

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