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REVIEW: 'Home Sick Pilots' #2 by Dan Watters, Caspar Wijngaard, and Aditya Bidikar

The Old James House has lost its ghosts. With her new powers, it's up to Ami to bring them back...whether they want to come home or not. Even when they're really big ghosts wrapped in metal, with lots of sharp edges and things. HOME SICK PILOTS #2 Writer: Dan Watters Artist: Caspar Wijngaard Letterer: Aditya Bidikar  Designer: Tom Muller Publisher: Image Comics Release Date: January 13, 2021 Cover Price: $3.99 Score:  ★★★☆☆ (3/5) A powered-up ghostified Ami has been compelled to find the ghosts of The Old James House in the form of an enchanted horseshoe. Its current bearer isn't going to give it up so easily. Meanwhile, Ami's friends Buzz and Rip are left looking for answers about her whereabouts back at the house. The second issue of Home Sick Pilots from Dan Watters and Caspar Wijngaard takes a surprising turn as it defies the expectations of a haunted house story established in its debut. Issue one was a stellar debut that had a lot of energy from its young protago

REVIEW: 'Romulus' #3 by Bryan Hill and Nelson Blake II


★★★★☆ (4/5)

Ashlar is stubborn, single-minded, talented, and determined to save Nicholas from the Order of Romulus. First, she needs to learn to control her emotions under the guidance of the Illuminati. Meanwhile, a defiant Nicholas gets an interesting offer as Bryan Hill and Nelson Blake II continue to bring the exciting 'Romulus' series to new heights. 

 The distinction between the two clandestine organizations is made clearer in issue three as well as where Ashlar's headspace is at. She is unrelenting and that makes her dangerous but without training any more confrontations against the Romulus could prove dire. Reluctantly, she succumbs to the training but it's still hard to tame a feral warrior like her. Those scenes are familiar but vividly captured through Blake's pencils. Few artists can lay out a fight scene like Blake does, full of fluidity and impact. 

Equally resistant to his situation is Nicholas. Remaining defiant to his captors, middle fingers up, Nicholas refuses to be a pawn in whatever game the Romulus are playing. It takes one slick-talking Romulus envoy to play to his ego to make him a surprising deal that changes the stakes. Hill's clever script reveals plot points about both factions that personify a chess game with each new tactic, a new piece is moved into place. The only wildcard remains Ashlar whose motivations and impulses may be too powerful to overcome. 

Again, Blakes' art is so clean and expressive that nothing goes to waste. It's all on the page, every dynamic fight sequence, every perfectly choreographed discussion, giving the story the cinematic effect it deserves.  What is even more impressive is Blake's ability to capture the inner turmoil of Ashlar and Nicholas respectively with subtle variances in their expressions or body language. There's a lot going on with each of them and Blake's storytelling conveyed in pictures is masterful. 

'Romulus' continues to evolve into one fascinating and exciting story with new revelations and motivations. Ashlar herself has room to grow and that makes this unique battle between warring factions all the more compelling. Hill and Blake are putting on a clinic on how to make a great comic. Pick it up now. 


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