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Swashbuckling Cyberpunk Adventure Takes Flight This April in 'Jules Verne's Lighthouse'

 Bestselling creative duo David Hine and Brian Haberlin—who brought readers breakout hits like The Marked and Sonata —are back again this April with an all-new adventure in Jules Verne’s: Lighthouse .  Set on the high seas of space, and based upon the work of master storyteller Jules Verne, this five-issue science fiction miniseries will launch from Image/Shadowline with an extra length first issue. "Brian introduced me to this lesser-known Jules Verne story of dastardly brigands and survival on a lonely, windswept island," said Hine. "We did the obvious thing and transformed it into an epic science-fiction tale of space piracy, wormholes, galaxy-spanning conflict and a glitchy but lovable robot called Moses." Jules Verne’s: Lighthouse is set at the edge of the galaxy, where there is a giant supercomputer known as the Lighthouse. The only brain powerful enough to navigate ships through a sargasso of naturally occurring wormholes, potentially cutting months or even

REVIEW: 'Infidel' #1 by Pornsak Pichetshote, Aaron Campbell, and Jose Villarrubia

'Infidel' #1 by Pornsak Pichetshote and Aaron Campbell arrives at a time when the horrors of everyday life for marginalized people is scary enough but add misogyny and xenophobia from demons and well, that's just multi-dimensional haterade. This contemporary horror story feels timely and brimming with scary thrills.


INFIDEL #1 

Writer: Pornsak Pichetshote
Artist: Aaron Campbell, Jose Villarrubia
Letterer: Jeff Powell
Publisher: Image Comics
Release Date: March 14, 2018
Cover Price: $3.99

Score: ★★★★1/2 (4.5/5)

Aisha is an American Muslim woman who just moved into a haunted apartment building with her boyfriend, his child, and his mother. It's the perfect horror movie set-up that includes a tragic incident that led to the killing of several people, the haunting aftermath of the explosion, a boyfriend's xenophobic possibly racist mother, and terrifying nightmares. Pichetshote has cooked up a potent cauldron consisting of the right horror tropes mixed with equally horrifying real-life anxieties and prejudices. It's all one giant concoction of bone-chilling dread and heightened fear. 

The constant question is of course, as with any scary movie, " why don't they just move out?" Aisha believes this horrific dreams and images are just a manifestation of her anxieties and worries. Building an instant family is a lot to deal with. Can she be a good mother-figure to his daughter? Can she dispel his mother's anti-Muslim feelings? These are all legitimate issues that could weigh heavily on any person but it's compounded by the unprovoked fear and racism Aisha contends with on a daily basis. This adds resonance to the story as well as the question "Are supernatural monsters the worst things to fear when society views you as a foreigner in your country?" It's a tough call. 

Also, living in a big city can be super expensive so a discounted rate for a building that saw an explosion take out some amenities (and people) leaving behind some salty sexist spirits might be worth the risk.

Aaron Campbell is a master of tension with a gritty style that soaks scenes in a menacing sheen. He's Pichetshote's director-cinematographer setting the tone with scratchy lines that invoke a looming terror around any and every corner, creating an atmosphere of suspense. When something lurks in the dark it can be chilling but when a monster appears, Campbell takes a full-frontal approach that shocks you in place. Jose Villarrubia colors most of it in subtle subdued almost weathered hues but the freaky apparitions take on a more realistic appearance with rich bolder colors. There's a heightened realism to the spirits that make them hauntingly threatening inducing goosebumps. 

'Infidel' is a suspenseful exercise in addressing the demons that lurk in life and the afterlife. Pichetshote has created a great character in Aisha who is the Everywoman, making her way trying to be good person amid the dregs of society. She has a strength that keeps her positive even when faced with monsters, literal and otherwise. Campbell's art simmers with tension and fright. 'Infidel' is a modern horror story that cleverly blurs the lines between reality and the supernatural.


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