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REVIEW: 'Home Sick Pilots' #2 by Dan Watters, Caspar Wijngaard, and Aditya Bidikar

The Old James House has lost its ghosts. With her new powers, it's up to Ami to bring them back...whether they want to come home or not. Even when they're really big ghosts wrapped in metal, with lots of sharp edges and things. HOME SICK PILOTS #2 Writer: Dan Watters Artist: Caspar Wijngaard Letterer: Aditya Bidikar  Designer: Tom Muller Publisher: Image Comics Release Date: January 13, 2021 Cover Price: $3.99 Score:  ★★★☆☆ (3/5) A powered-up ghostified Ami has been compelled to find the ghosts of The Old James House in the form of an enchanted horseshoe. Its current bearer isn't going to give it up so easily. Meanwhile, Ami's friends Buzz and Rip are left looking for answers about her whereabouts back at the house. The second issue of Home Sick Pilots from Dan Watters and Caspar Wijngaard takes a surprising turn as it defies the expectations of a haunted house story established in its debut. Issue one was a stellar debut that had a lot of energy from its young protago

REVIEW: 'Come Into Me' #2 by Zac Thompson, Lonnie Nadler and Piotr Kowalski

When a woman dies after her consciousness is transferred into the mind of inventor Sebastian, she becomes the voice in his head he can't escape. While they try to come up with a way to store her consciousness externally Sebastian must reevaluate his life whether he wants to or not.


COME INTO ME #2

Writer: Zac Thompson, Lonnie Nadler
Artist: Piotr Kowalski, Niko Guardia
Letterer: Ryan Ferrier
Publisher: Black Mask Studios
Release Date: May 2, 2018
Cover Price: $3.99

Score: ★★★★☆ (4/5)

Anytime readers stray from the familiar superhero fare in comics, an entirely new world opens up of endless possibilities and stories. There's no shortage of genres obviously, and Come Into Me occupies a couple of those. It's a body horror story first and foremost but it's also a sci-fi medical drama with a clever feminist undercurrent. Imagine a Black Mirror-version of "All of Me" written by Michael Crichton and directed by David Cronenberg and you get the feeling invoked by this excellent series.

Sebastian is kind of a dick and he knows it. He's been overcompensating for a long time. His brilliance has led to one abrasive demeanor. This transference project was supposed to be his miracle invention, a medical marvel that will change the way we interact with each other by sharing a body. Now, that Becky's body has died she's trapped in his mind with access to all his memories. She begins to unravel the events of his life that have shaped his personality and it's not always pretty. 

She also gets to experience what it's like to be a man whose voice is suddenly given weight. It's something as a woman isn't always the case. As a guy, being taken seriously and listened to isn't usually a problem especially in a supervisory role. So when Becky mentions her suddenly empowering moment after taking over Sebastian's meeting it hit me. What I've always taken for granted, women sometimes don't have that the common courtesy of being given their proper respect and attention. It's a subtle and brief point but impactful because it's unexpected. 

Zac Thompson and Lonnie Nadler find the drama on different fronts. Of course, there's the conflict in Sebastian's own head sharing the space with Becky, the race to find a method and a vessel in which to transfer Becky's consciousness, the ethical dilemma of selling this transference as a new type of social media, and possible side effects of such a procedure. There's plenty to sink your teeth into which makes this as involving as a novel. 

Penciler Piotr Kowalski, colorist Niko Guardia, and letterer Ryan Ferrier work in unison to produce some inventive images that are dense with color and imagination. Their interpretation of what being in someone else's mind might look like works and the juggling of perspective between Sebastian and Becky is a delicate dance that doesn't fail. It all has to work together from the character designs to the right color tones to the lettering that differentiates the voices because if not the book doesn't work. However, there's so much precision and care taken in each and every panel that the reader is immersed in the story. 

'Come Into Me' is a compelling cautionary tale with subtext and unexpected pathos of a complicated protagonist. Issue two dives deeper into the psyche of Sebastian and the stakes involved for everyone in and around him. This is really a smart and thought-provoking story that entertains some controversial futuristic technology with some very human side effects. The story continues to evolve surpassing even its debut with some tantalizing twists. 
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