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HEAVY METAL: 'Chasing The Dragon' #1 is Available Now

 In Chasing the Dragon , New York Times Bestselling writer Denton J. Tipton and acclaimed painter menton3 explore a dark fantasy world ravaged by the rampant abuse of a drug made from the blood of dragons. When two young slaves discover a terrible secret that could change the course of the world, will a meek alchemist’s apprentice and a drug-addled concubine survive long outside their cages? For fans of Game of Thrones and Breaking Bad . CHASING THE DRAGON Writer: Denton J. Tiption  Artist: menton3 Publisher: Heavy Metal Release: Feb. 26, 2021  Order Here

KICKSTARTER SPOTLIGHT: Henry Barajas' Tribute to His Great-Grandfather's Legacy in 'La Voz De M.A.Y.O.'

A resonant, neglected slice of American history is told for the first time, in graphic-novel format. Featuring art by Jason “Gonzo” Gonzalez, edited by Claire Napier, and script and lettering by journalist, comedian, author, native Tucsonan, and great-grandson of the story’s main character, Tata Rambo, aka Ramon Jaurigue, Henry Barajas.


La Voz De M.A.Y.O. is the true story of Ramon Jaurigue, an orphan and WWII veteran who co-founded the Mexican, American, Yaqui, and Others (M.A.Y.O.) organization, which successfully lobbied the Tucson City Council to improve living and working conditions for members of the local Pascua Yaqui tribe. Largely due to Ramon’s activism, both in M.A.Y.O. in and with Model Cities Program, Yaqui were successfully integrated into the expanding metropolis of Tucson: families bought property, roads and sidewalks were built, and sewage systems installed. Ramon and his colleagues even founded a night school to help adults learn English and established the region’s first low-cost clinic to offer birth control.



Untiring in their efforts for equal rights and opportunities, Ramon and M.A.Y.O.eventually secured official U.S. government recognition for the Pascua Yaqui tribe. Local government didn’t give up their plans to bridge Tucson to the west coast and taxpayer dollars to the Old Pueblo’s indigenous people without a fight. The Carter Administration was skeptical of the Yaqui’s eligibility, so it took compromise from Ramon and the tribe. While trying to keep 12,000 families together, Ramon struggled with taking care of his own family life. 


Utilizing newspaper clippings, interviews with surviving MAYO members, and Ramon’s authored articles, La Voz De M.A.Y.O. dramatizes the remarkable life and achievements of my great-grandfather—and in so doing, tells the story not just of a single man, but of a family, a tribe, a nation.


Pledges begin as low as $1 for this amazing untold story. Rewards range from a written Thank You to digital and print copies to original art and packages of all those plus merchandises. This deeply personal and inspiring biography is essential reading that reveals an important life and a life's work. Give 'La Voz De M.A.Y.O.' your consideration and pledge to make this a reality. 

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