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All-New Latinx Fantasy Mini-Series 'Helm Greycastle' from Henry Barajas and Top Cow Lands this April

Critically acclaimed writer Henry Barajas ( La Voz de M.A.Y.O.: Tata Rambo ) teams up with artist Rahmat M. Handoko ( Guardians of the Galaxy: Awesome Mix, Ultimate Spider-Man: Infinite Comic ) and colorist Bryan Valenza ( Witchblade ) for the all-new Latinx fantasy series Helm Greycastle . This four-issue miniseries will launch from Image/Top Cow Productions this April.  Helm Greycastle will also feature alternative covers by such talent as David Lapham ( Stray Bullets ), Tony Parker ( God of War ), and Becky Cloonan ( Immortal Wonder Woman ), along with a bonus Latinx one-shot RPG ( 5E compatible ) written by Tristan J. Tarwater ( Rolled & Told ) and showcasing art by Jen Vaughn ( d20 Dames ). "What if the Aztec Empire defeated the Spanish Conquistadors? As a Mexican-American who has had no formal education on my indigenous background, writing this book has been very empowering," said Barajas. "I'm excited to share some Mesoamerican history while mixing it wit

REVIEW: 'Paper Girls' #3 by Brian K. Vaughan, Cliff Chiang, and Matt Wilson


★★★★★ (5/5)

Paper Girls is so good you want to recommend it to others, but you don't want to give away too much so others can discover it on their own. This makes it hard to review because it's a compelling story but describing what happens would spoil it. No wonder the solicitation for this issue was so short. "The ongoing mystery series from BRIAN K. VAUGHAN & CLIFF CHIANG charges ahead, as the girls have a close encounter with an unexpected visitor." While it's accurate, it's only part of the story.


The mystery continues as people keep disappearing, dinosaurs pound the earth and rule the sky. Another visitor emerges whose motives aren't clear but certainly pose a threat to other new beings roaming the empty streets. Meanwhile, our heroines are racing against time, trying to save a friend in a woodpaneled station wagon. The 80's are alive and well in Vaughan's homage to kids-in-peril adventure movies. Yet, Vaughan does Spielberg one better by putting a group of girls as the protagonists. 

It's an aspect that's a welcomed change because unlike the movies of the 80's that involved girls, these girls are about unraveling a mystery, fending off possible aliens, and looking out for one another. It's not about boys, falling in love, or appeasing male leads. So far in this story they could be our last line of defense against whatever is causing these incredible events. 

Chiang's character designs are as immaculate as ever with expressive facial expressions and clothing that is spot on. Matt Wilson drapes the story in ominous grades of purples, violets, and fuschias. It hovers over the town with the right amount of eerieness giving the story a sort of noirish tone dipped in purple instead of black. 

Obviously, 'Paper Girls' is more than just nostalgia. It's a slow-burning sci-fi story being unfolded with enough moments of surprise and awe to keep the reader riveted and demanding more by the end of it. Vaughan and Chiang have captured the wonder and fun of another era that makes 'Paper Girls' a unique and satisfying experience. 

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