Skip to main content

Featured

REVIEW: 'Stray Dogs' #1 by Tony Fleecs, Trish Forstner, and Brad Simpson

 Lady and the Tramp meets Silence of the Lambs. It's scary being the new dog. Sophie can’t remember what happened. She doesn’t know how she ended up in this house. She doesn’t recognize any of these other dogs. She knows something terrible happened, but she just…can’t…recall...WAIT! Where’s her lady? A five-issue Don Bluth-style suspense thriller by My Little Pony comic artists TONY FLEECS and TRISH FORSTNER, STRAY DOGS is Lady and the Tramp meets Silence of the Lambs.   STRAY DOGS #1 Writer: Tony Fleecs Artist: Trish Forstner, Brad Simpson Publisher: Image Comics Release Date: February 24, 2021 Cover Price: $3.99 Score:  ★★★★☆ (4/5) 'Stray Dogs' may see itself as " Lady and the Tramp meets Silence of the Lambs " but issue one was all Alfred Hitchcock. The mystery, the tension, the dread, the lingering questions suffocate each page soon after our shellshocked protagonist, the trembling Sophie arrives at a strange house full of other rescues. Something is amiss an

REVIEW: 'Poison Ivy: Cycle of Life and Death' #1 by Amy Chu, Clay Mann, Seth Mann, and Ulises Arreola


★★★★☆ (4/5)

As a long time villain in the Bat-world, Poison Ivy hasn't always gotten her due. She's often overlooked with some of the crazier rogues taking the spotlight and with the popularity of Harley Quinn, Dr. Pamela Isley may be living in her shadow. Thankfully, DC Comics saw her value enough to release a limited series with Amy Chu and Clay Mann that reintroduces her to fans. And yes, Harley makes an appearance. 

'Poison Ivy: Cycle of Life and Death' #1 showcases the scientific side of Ivy and her obsession with organic plant life. She harnesses the power of plants, talking to them, making them do her bidding, determined to see them flourish and nourished. She cherishes her solitude, her communing with plants and experiments. It's this love that keeps her at Gotham Botanical Gardens under the mentorship of her colleague Dr. Luisa Cruz. There's a nice surprise visit from the kids of Gotham Academy making a brief cameo. 

The chemistry with Harley is a little strained. Harley doesn't feel as though Ivy sees her as an equal but they seem perfectly in tune when bashing some unruly patrons in a bar fight. Ultimately, Ivy is happiest alone and with her plants. She hasn't been depicted very well in live-action, portrayed as an over-the-top campy angry nerd villain. She's fared much better in animation where she's smart, snarky, and powerful. Here, Chu conveys Ivy's supreme intelligence, passion, and confidence. All the characteristics you'd hope to find in a worthy villain that you can also admire. 

Clay Mann does an impeccable job designing every character and scene. Lines are so precise and clean, expressions and body language speak for themselves. The only critique would be the odd angles of perspective at times. It seems like we're getting the first person perspective of a dwarf, looking upwards at other characters or from behind someone's skirt. Seth Mann handles the inking providing much depth where needed and Ulises Arreola's colors give the issue the right vibrancy especially when Ivy and Harley are on the page. 

'Poison Ivy: Cycle of Life and Death' #1 is a great start to reestablishing the underrated Poison Ivy as a brilliant and powerful figure capable of emerging from Harley Quinn's shadow. The first issue wisely chooses a character-driven story that leads to an intriguing cliffhanger. Established fans should love this while new readers may want to be patient to see where this mystery goes.  

Comments