PREVIEW: 'Cut-Man' #1 (Digital) by Alexander Banks-Jongman and Robert Ahmad

Hank Kelly is immortal, and while he revels in the fame and fortune his immortality brings him, the lives of those caught in his wake are being changed forever.

CUT-MAN is a love letter to noir and thriller cinema,
on comiXology 4/8/2020!
CUT-MAN #1 (Digital-First)

Writer(s): Alexander Banks-Jongman 
Artist Name(s): Robert Ahmad 
Cover Artist(s): Robert Ahmad
25 pgs./ M / FC
$2.99 

Creator and writer Alexander Banks-Jongman talked about his new digital-first creator-owned Action Lab: Danger Zone series CUT-MAN:

Inspired by the works of Tom King (notably, Mister Miracle and Vision), Scott Snyder (notably, Batman) and Grant Morrison (Animal Man) and influenced by my love of noir and thriller cinema (like the works of David Fincher, Se7en and Gone Girl), CUT-MAN is an exploration of broken people, the search for truth and the corrupting effects of power.

Hank Kelly might be blessed with great power, but his is not a superhero story. CUT-MAN is an exploration of broken people, the search for truth and the corrupting effects of power. If you are a fan of stories digging into the psyche and the struggle of people finding purpose – CUT-MAN is the book for you. Across every issue of the mini-series, we delve deeper into the protagonist, uncovering more and more of what makes him the man he is. Furthermore, if you enjoy stories that explore strange and unique concepts, CUT-MAN takes the cliché idea of immortality, and puts a dark twist on it, giving the power a grim consequence.

I want the reader to go on a journey with Hank Kelly – and follow his transformation from a flawed man to something darker, by his exposure to fame and fortune. I’d like the reader to make judgments on the morality of the characters, and whether or not they are wholly evil or good.

The comic has two central characters, Hank Kelly and the detective Rosalind Lovejoy – who are on a collision course, with one aiming to destroy the other. With these two central forces, I want the reader to make a decision of who they want to be victorious.

At the heart of the story is Hank’s twisted ideal of family. Throughout the piece, he is desperately trying to cling to his wife and daughter – despite the fact they’ve been separated for a long time. Hank’s desire for this is the emotional core, as a man – Hank wants nothing more than to be loved and adored. However, when he can’t get this from his family, he turns to the masses of followers, who pray to the immortal man.









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